en
Ücretsiz
Henry David Thoreau

Walden

    Vadim Morozovalıntı yaptı6 yıl önce
    I had three chairs in my house; one for solitude, two for friendship, three for society. When visitors came in larger and unexpected numbers there was but the third chair for them all
    Настя Мозговаяalıntı yaptı5 ay önce
    Why should they be­gin dig­ging their graves as soon as they are born?
    Настя Мозговаяalıntı yaptıgeçen yıl
    I should not talk so much about my­self if there were any­body else whom I knew as well. Un­for­tu­nately, I am con­fined to this theme by the nar­row­ness of my ex­pe­ri­ence.
    arshadshaikh42alıntı yaptı5 yıl önce
    "To know that we know what we know, and that we do not know what we do not know, that is true knowledge."
    b5715170792alıntı yaptı6 gün önce
    When I wrote the fol­low­ing pages, or rather the bulk of them, I lived alone, in the woods, a mile from any neigh­bor, in a house which I had built my­self, on the shore of Walden Pond, in Con­cord, Mas­sachusetts, and earned my liv­ing by the la­bor of my hands only. I lived there two years and two months. At present I am a so­journer in civ­i­lized life again.

    I should not ob­trude my af­fairs so much on the no­tice of my read­ers if very par­tic­u­lar in­quiries had not been made by my towns­men con­cern­ing my mode of life, which some would call im­per­ti­nent, though they do not ap­pear to me at all im­per­ti­nent, but, con­sid­er­ing the cir­cum­stances, very nat­u­ral and per­ti­nent. Some have asked what I got to eat; if I did not feel lone­some; if I was not afraid; and the like. Others have been cu­ri­ous to learn what por­tion of my in­come I de­voted to char­i­ta­ble pur­poses; and some, who have large fam­i­lies, how many poor chil­dren I main­tained. I will there­fore ask those of my read­ers who feel no par­tic­u­lar in­ter­est in me to par­don me if I un­der­take to an­swer some of these ques­tions in this book. In most books, the I, or first per­son, is omit­ted; in this it will be re­tained; that, in re­spect to ego­tism, is the main dif­fer­ence. We com­monly do not re­mem­ber that it is, af­ter all, al­ways the first per­son that is speak­ing. I should not talk so much about my­self if there were any­body else whom I knew as well. Un­for­tu­nately, I am con­fined to this theme by the nar­row­ness of my ex­pe­ri­ence. More­over, I, on my side, re­quire of ev­ery writer, first or last, a sim­ple and sin­cere ac­count of his own life, and not merely what he has heard of other men’s lives; some such ac­count as he would send to his kin­dred from a dis­tant land; for if he has lived sin­cerely, it must have been in a dis­tant land to me. Per­haps these pages are more par­tic­u­larly ad­dressed to poor stu­dents. As for the rest of my read­ers, they will ac­cept such por­tions as ap­ply to them. I trust that none will stretch the seams in putting on the coat, for it may do good ser­vice to him whom it fits.
    Debszalıntı yaptıgeçen ay
    The suc­cess of great schol­ars and thinkers is com­monly a courtier-like suc­cess, not kingly, not manly.
    Debszalıntı yaptıgeçen ay
    None can be an im­par­tial or wise ob­server of hu­man life but from the van­tage ground of what we should call vol­un­tary poverty.
    Debszalıntı yaptıgeçen ay
    Ac­cord­ing to Liebig, man’s body is a stove, and food the fuel which keeps up the in­ter­nal com­bus­tion in the lungs
    Debszalıntı yaptıgeçen ay
    know that we know what we know, and that we do not know what we do not know, that is true knowl­edge.
    Debszalıntı yaptıgeçen ay
    Na­ture is as well adapted to our weak­ness as to our strength.
    Debszalıntı yaptıgeçen ay
    Na­ture and hu­man life are as var­i­ous as our sev­eral con­sti­tu­tions. Who shall say what prospect life of­fers to an­other?
    Debszalıntı yaptıgeçen ay
    The mass of men lead lives of quiet des­per­a­tion
    Debszalıntı yaptıgeçen ay
    Public opin­ion is a weak tyrant com­pared with our own pri­vate opin­ion.
    Debszalıntı yaptıgeçen ay
    worst of all when you are the slave-driver of your­self.
    b5825192143alıntı yaptı2 ay önce
    How­ever mean your life is, meet it and live it; do not shun it and call it hard names. It is not so bad as you are. It looks poor­est when you are rich­est. The fault­finder will find faults even in par­adise. Love your life, poor as it is. You may per­haps have some pleas­ant, thrilling, glo­ri­ous hours, even in a poor­house. The set­ting sun is re­flected from the win­dows of the almshouse as brightly as from the rich man’s abode; the snow melts be­fore its door as early in the spring. I do not see but a quiet mind may live as con­tent­edly there, and have as cheer­ing thoughts, as in a palace. The town’s poor seem to me of­ten to live the most in­de­pen­dent lives of any. Maybe they are sim­ply great enough to re­ceive with­out mis­giv­ing. Most think that they are above be­ing sup­ported by the town; but it of­tener hap­pens that they are not above sup­port­ing them­selves by dis­hon­est means, which should be more dis­rep­utable. Cul­ti­vate poverty like a gar­den herb, like sage. Do not trou­ble your­self much to get new things, whether clothes or friends. Turn the old; re­turn to them. Things do not change; we change. Sell your clothes and keep your thoughts. God will see that you do not want so­ci­ety. If I were con­fined to a cor­ner of a gar­ret all my days, like a spi­der, the world would be just as large to me while I had my thoughts about me. The philoso­pher said: “From an army of three di­vi­sions one can take away its gen­eral, and put it in dis­or­der; from the man the most ab­ject and vul­gar one can­not take away his thought.” Do not seek so anx­iously to be de­vel­oped, to sub­ject your­self to many in­flu­ences to be played on; it is all dis­si­pa­tion. Hu­mil­ity like dark­ness re­veals the heav­enly lights. The shad­ows of poverty and mean­ness gather around us, “and lo! cre­ation widens to our view.” We are of­ten re­minded that if there were be­stowed on us the wealth of Croe­sus, our aims must still be the same, and our means es­sen­tially the same. More­over, if you are re­stricted in your range by poverty, if you can­not buy books and news­pa­pers, for in­stance, you are but con­fined to the most sig­nif­i­cant and vi­tal ex­pe­ri­ences; you are com­pelled to deal with the ma­te­rial which yields the most sugar and the most starch. It is life near the bone where it is sweet­est. You are de­fended from be­ing a tri­fler. No man loses ever on a lower level by mag­na­nim­ity on a higher. Su­per­flu­ous wealth can buy su­per­fluities only. Money is not re­quired to buy one nec­es­sary of the soul.
    b5825192143alıntı yaptı2 ay önce
    Tom Hyde, the tin­ker, stand­ing on the gal­lows, was asked if he had any­thing to say. “Tell the tai­lors,” said he, “to re­mem­ber to make a knot in their thread be­fore they take the first stitch.” His com­pan­ion’s prayer is for­got­ten.
    b5825192143alıntı yaptı2 ay önce
    Say what you have to say, not what you ought. Any truth is bet­ter than make-be­lieve.
    b5825192143alıntı yaptı2 ay önce
    For the most part, we are not where we are, but in a false po­si­tion
    b5825192143alıntı yaptı2 ay önce
    A liv­ing dog is bet­ter than a dead lion. Shall a man go and hang him­self be­cause he be­longs to the race of pyg­mies, and not be the big­gest pygmy that he can? Let ev­ery­one mind his own busi­ness, and en­deavor to be what he was made.
    b5825192143alıntı yaptı2 ay önce
    I learned this, at least, by my ex­per­i­ment: that if one ad­vances con­fi­dently in the di­rec­tion of his dreams, and en­deav­ors to live the life which he has imag­ined, he will meet with a suc­cess un­ex­pected in com­mon hours. He will put some things be­hind, will pass an in­vis­i­ble bound­ary; new, uni­ver­sal, and more lib­eral laws will be­gin to es­tab­lish them­selves around and within him; or the old laws be ex­panded, and in­ter­preted in his fa­vor in a more lib­eral sense, and he will live with the li­cense of a higher or­der of be­ings. In pro­por­tion as he sim­pli­fies his life, the laws of the uni­verse will ap­pear less com­plex, and soli­tude will not be soli­tude, nor poverty poverty, nor weak­ness weak­ness. If you have built cas­tles in the air, your work need not be lost; that is where they should be. Now put the foun­da­tions un­der them
fb2epub
Dosyalarınızı sürükleyin ve bırakın (bir kerede en fazla 5 tane)